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Thursday Thirteen

Today’s Thursday Thirteen edition I will be writing 13 things about my favorite author Catherine Anderson. All of this information is quoted from her website, Catherine Anderson.

Thirteen Things about Catherine Anderson

1. As a very small child, I played dolls at my mother’s feet while she clacked away on an old Underwood. Yes, you guessed it. She was a writer. This has always led me to wonder if the writing bug is passed down genetically or something we catch, like a flu virus. I can build a very good case to back up either theory.

2. My mother often read her work aloud. Long before I knew my alphabet, I had been introduced to the wonderful, magical world of fiction. While she worked at her desk, I created stories for my dolls. Writing, if not in my blood, was drummed into my head by the clack of those typewriter keys. By the time I was a teenager, I was writing my own stories-in notebooks or on paper sacks. It was a compulsion, something I absolutely had to do. I can honestly say that being a writer was never a choice I consciously made, but more an intrinsic part of my makeup. Imagine if you will, choosing not to breathe. That was how I felt about writing, that it was necessary to my survival.

3. My mother was always supportive of my writing bent in those early years. Later, my husband Sid joined my support circle. With both of them so firmly behind me, it’s hard for me to believe now that I didn’t immediately pursue a writing career. Perhaps every writer must dabble for a while before taking the leap. Whatever the reason, back then I was what I now term a closet writer. I stole time to write and hid my work in a drawer. Breaking into book publishing is difficult, and I was savvy enough about the business to know that. Becoming a published writer had always been my dream, but back then, I considered it to be an impossible one.

4. Meanwhile, I had a “real” life to live, and I decided I should go to college. After I took my entrance exams, the dean telephoned to inform me that my scores were very high, but what impressed him most was my grasp of English. That should have told me something, but I thought the dean called everybody. “Hello, this is Dean So-and-So, and I’m calling to tell you that you flunked.” I’d always excelled at English. So? I needed a real profession.

5. Sid was an entrepreneur, so I decided to major in accounting. It only made sense. I reasoned that I would be able to keep the books, get my credentials to be a CPA, and be a valuable asset to him. Big mistake. Though I excelled in those studies, proving to myself and everyone else that I did indeed have some left-brain activity going on, I was bored to tears. I often had an awful feeling of claustrophobia. Was this really what I wanted to do with the rest of my life? I began considering a change of major, but nothing sounded exciting to me.

6. One afternoon when I came home after classes, there was a letter in the mail, inviting me to join a sorority exclusively for women with high GPAs. I’d worked hard to pull those impressive grades. I should have been elated. Instead, I sat down, put my head in my hands, and wept. I felt as if I had dug a deep hole, jumped in, and would never find my way out. I know that sounds insane, but when you force yourself to walk a path that doesn’t beckon to your heart, you really are burying yourself, in a way. If I’d never heard the words, “debit” and “credit” again, I would have been happy. The next day I trudged to my classes and dutifully took notes. We’d spent too much money on my education for me to quit.

7. When I look back on it now, I know God truly does work in strange ways. That morning one of my professors asked if she could use samples of my creative writing on an overhead projector to teach. I actually skipped economics to stand in the hall and listen to what she said about my work. That old adage that you’ll never hear anything good about yourself when you eavesdrop is false.

8. That night I went to Sid and asked if he’d get mad if I quit school. I didn’t want to keep books. I wanted to write them! I just knew he’d be furious. Instead he bought me my first electric typewriter. A couple of years later, he sprang for a word processor. He never berated me for dropping out of school, and now he laughingly says the money he spent on writing equipment was the best investment he ever made.

9. With a man like that in my life, how could I become anything but a romance writer? I wish I could say the rest of my journey to becoming published was a slam-dunk, but I had a long way to go before my work was good enough to make the grade. Having the desire and a good command of English isn’t enough. Most of us must first learn our craft.

10. I will take a moment here to thank one very special person for helping me to do that. Her name is Stella Cameron. In those early days when I was struggling to perfect my work, she was a dear friend to me. I will always admire her, not only as a fine writer, but also for being such a wonderful person.

11. I sold my first book to Harlequin Intrigue and went on to write three more before I tried my hand at single-title historical romance. Nine books later, I did a single-title contemporary, followed by “Cherish,” another historical. I plan to start switching back and forth between contemporary and historical again soon.

12. I am now living my dream. The child who yearned to be a writer is now a woman who has accomplished her goal. Two years ago, Sid and I moved to Central Oregon. For several months, we lived on the river in a three-bedroom log cabin, which we loved, but it wasn’t large enough. Adding on to a log structure is tricky, and that was determined to be an unwise choice by several designers. Spring a year ago, we finally found a one-of-a-kind property, 160 acres of Ponderosa pines, surrounded by state and national forestland. The house, which sits on a ridge, offering spectacular, panoramic views of the mountains, has potential—which is why my office is in the blue print stage. Eventually we will have the home we want, sitting on the land we want.

13. For now, it’s adequate, and the seclusion is ideal for writing. In my leisure time, I love to go walking with my dogs. It’s incredibly freeing to set off from my front door and walk as far as I wish without seeing another house. In the evenings, weather allowing, we sit on the deck, sipping wine and enjoying the fabulous view. In cold weather, we watch it snow from the Jacuzzi. Occasionally deer or elk come calling. Being an animal lover of longstanding, I’ve become a vegetarian. Our land is posted with No Hunting signs. I even have a No Hunting sign on my birdhouse. Life is good up on Cinnamon Ridge, not just for us, but for all our furry friends as well.

Get the Thursday Thirteen code here!

The purpose of the meme is to get to know everyone who participates a little bit better every Thursday. Visiting fellow Thirteeners is encouraged! If you participate, leave the link to your Thirteen in others’ comments. It’s easy, and fun! Trackbacks, pings, comment links accepted!

Today’s Thursday Thirteen edition I will be writing 13 things about my favorite author Catherine Anderson. All of this information is quoted from her website, Catherine Anderson.


Thirteen Things about Catherine Anderson

1. As a very small child, I played dolls at my mother’s feet while she clacked away on an old Underwood. Yes, you guessed it. She was a writer. This has always led me to wonder if the writing bug is passed down genetically or something we catch, like a flu virus. I can build a very good case to back up either theory.

2. My mother often read her work aloud. Long before I knew my alphabet, I had been introduced to the wonderful, magical world of fiction. While she worked at her desk, I created stories for my dolls. Writing, if not in my blood, was drummed into my head by the clack of those typewriter keys. By the time I was a teenager, I was writing my own stories-in notebooks or on paper sacks. It was a compulsion, something I absolutely had to do. I can honestly say that being a writer was never a choice I consciously made, but more an intrinsic part of my makeup. Imagine if you will, choosing not to breathe. That was how I felt about writing, that it was necessary to my survival.

3. My mother was always supportive of my writing bent in those early years. Later, my husband Sid joined my support circle. With both of them so firmly behind me, it’s hard for me to believe now that I didn’t immediately pursue a writing career. Perhaps every writer must dabble for a while before taking the leap. Whatever the reason, back then I was what I now term a closet writer. I stole time to write and hid my work in a drawer. Breaking into book publishing is difficult, and I was savvy enough about the business to know that. Becoming a published writer had always been my dream, but back then, I considered it to be an impossible one.

4. Meanwhile, I had a “real” life to live, and I decided I should go to college. After I took my entrance exams, the dean telephoned to inform me that my scores were very high, but what impressed him most was my grasp of English. That should have told me something, but I thought the dean called everybody. “Hello, this is Dean So-and-So, and I’m calling to tell you that you flunked.” I’d always excelled at English. So? I needed a real profession.

5. Sid was an entrepreneur, so I decided to major in accounting. It only made sense. I reasoned that I would be able to keep the books, get my credentials to be a CPA, and be a valuable asset to him. Big mistake. Though I excelled in those studies, proving to myself and everyone else that I did indeed have some left-brain activity going on, I was bored to tears. I often had an awful feeling of claustrophobia. Was this really what I wanted to do with the rest of my life? I began considering a change of major, but nothing sounded exciting to me.

6. One afternoon when I came home after classes, there was a letter in the mail, inviting me to join a sorority exclusively for women with high GPAs. I’d worked hard to pull those impressive grades. I should have been elated. Instead, I sat down, put my head in my hands, and wept. I felt as if I had dug a deep hole, jumped in, and would never find my way out. I know that sounds insane, but when you force yourself to walk a path that doesn’t beckon to your heart, you really are burying yourself, in a way. If I’d never heard the words, “debit” and “credit” again, I would have been happy. The next day I trudged to my classes and dutifully took notes. We’d spent too much money on my education for me to quit.

7. When I look back on it now, I know God truly does work in strange ways. That morning one of my professors asked if she could use samples of my creative writing on an overhead projector to teach. I actually skipped economics to stand in the hall and listen to what she said about my work. That old adage that you’ll never hear anything good about yourself when you eavesdrop is false.

8. That night I went to Sid and asked if he’d get mad if I quit school. I didn’t want to keep books. I wanted to write them! I just knew he’d be furious. Instead he bought me my first electric typewriter. A couple of years later, he sprang for a word processor. He never berated me for dropping out of school, and now he laughingly says the money he spent on writing equipment was the best investment he ever made.

9. With a man like that in my life, how could I become anything but a romance writer? I wish I could say the rest of my journey to becoming published was a slam-dunk, but I had a long way to go before my work was good enough to make the grade. Having the desire and a good command of English isn’t enough. Most of us must first learn our craft.

10. I will take a moment here to thank one very special person for helping me to do that. Her name is Stella Cameron. In those early days when I was struggling to perfect my work, she was a dear friend to me. I will always admire her, not only as a fine writer, but also for being such a wonderful person.

11. I sold my first book to Harlequin Intrigue and went on to write three more before I tried my hand at single-title historical romance. Nine books later, I did a single-title contemporary, followed by “Cherish,” another historical. I plan to start switching back and forth between contemporary and historical again soon.

12. I am now living my dream. The child who yearned to be a writer is now a woman who has accomplished her goal. Two years ago, Sid and I moved to Central Oregon. For several months, we lived on the river in a three-bedroom log cabin, which we loved, but it wasn’t large enough. Adding on to a log structure is tricky, and that was determined to be an unwise choice by several designers. Spring a year ago, we finally found a one-of-a-kind property, 160 acres of Ponderosa pines, surrounded by state and national forestland. The house, which sits on a ridge, offering spectacular, panoramic views of the mountains, has potential—which is why my office is in the blue print stage. Eventually we will have the home we want, sitting on the land we want.

13. For now, it’s adequate, and the seclusion is ideal for writing. In my leisure time, I love to go walking with my dogs. It’s incredibly freeing to set off from my front door and walk as far as I wish without seeing another house. In the evenings, weather allowing, we sit on the deck, sipping wine and enjoying the fabulous view. In cold weather, we watch it snow from the Jacuzzi. Occasionally deer or elk come calling. Being an animal lover of longstanding, I’ve become a vegetarian. Our land is posted with No Hunting signs. I even have a No Hunting sign on my birdhouse. Life is good up on Cinnamon Ridge, not just for us, but for all our furry friends as well.

Get the Thursday Thirteen code here!

The purpose of the meme is to get to know everyone who participates a little bit better every Thursday. Visiting fellow Thirteeners is encouraged! If you participate, leave the link to your Thirteen in others’ comments. It’s easy, and fun! Trackbacks, pings, comment links accepted!

Today’s Thursday Thirteen edition I will be writing 13 things about my favorite author Linda Lael Miller. I’ve been reading Linda Lael Miller’s McKettrick series all week so I felt that I should make my Thursday Thirteen for this week about her. All of this information is quoted from her website, Linda Lael Miller.


Thirteen Things about Linda Lael Miller

1. Twenty-four years after she sold her first novel, Linda Lael Miller is having what anyone would call a stellar year.

2. The self-proclaimed barn goddess and author of novels set in the West of today and yesterday is celebrating exciting career milestones.

3. With 70-some books to her credit, Linda is watching her modern-day McKettrick Men trilogy soar to the top of all the national bestseller lists, and the Romance Writers of America have announced Linda as the recipient of their prestigious 2007 Lifetime Achievement Award. And the year is still young.

4. But what makes these successes all the more enjoyable is that Linda has come home, home to Spokane, Washington, home to writing the stories of her heart, stories set in the Western culture of her childhood, and home to living where she can pull on her boots and ride her beloved horses.

5. Inside, there’s the clatter of little paws, her dogs, Sadie and Bernice, and the elegant treading of two cats that Linda claims rule the roost.

6. The daughter of a town marshal, Linda grew up in Northport, WA, a community of 500 on the Columbia River, 120 miles north of her birthplace, Spokane. Her childhood remembrances include riding horses and playing cowgirl on her grandparents’ nearby farm. So rustic was her grandparents’ spread that in the early days it lacked the conveniences of electricity and running water.

7. As delightful as this childhood was, though, Linda longed to see the world. After graduating as valedictorian of her high school class, she left to pursue her dream. Because of the success of her author career, Linda was able to live part-time in London for several years, spend time in Italy and travel to such far-off destinations as Russia, Hong Kong and Israel. Now, Linda says, the wanderlust is (mostly) out of her blood, and she’s come full circle, back to the people and the places she knows and loves.

8. Before Linda begins her writing day, she takes her first cup of coffee while enjoying the scenic view of the wooded draw behind her new home. Inspired by the view, which occasionally includes a wandering moose, she focuses on her work-in-progress. It might be another contemporary Western romance, like McKettrick’s Luck, McKettrick’s Pride or McKettrick’s Heart, or it might be a new Western historical, such as July’s hardcover, A Wanted Man. It also might be a romantic thriller, such as Deadly Gamble, which launched another winning Linda Lael Miller series for her enthusiastic publisher, HQN Books.

9. Devoted to helping others pursue their dreams, Miller is excited about another endeavor. Each year she sponsors a round of competition for her Linda Lael Miller Scholarships for Women. The stipends, which she funds from her writing and speaking earnings, enable women 25 years and older to improve their lot in life through education. Unlike traditional scholarships, Linda’s may be used for childcare, transportation, or any other expense that stands between a woman’s dreams and their fulfillment.

10. It’s no wonder the protagonists in Miller’s novels are women her readers admire for their honor, courage, trustworthiness, valor and determination to succeed, despite overwhelming odds. “These timelessly admirable qualities make them excellent role models for young women,” Miller explains. “The male leads possess equally noble traits that today’s woman would be delighted to find in her life’s mate.”

11. And speaking of finding, Linda is excited about her association with The Humane Society of the United States, for whom she has become an advocate for the group’s Pets for Life program. Once someone finds a furry friend to bring into their home, Linda and The HSUS want to help them learn how to keep the critter for life.

12. Linda traces the birth of her writing career to the day when a Northport teacher told her that the stories she was writing were good, that she just might have a future in writing. Later, when she decided to write novels, she endured her share of rejection before she made her first sale in 1983.

13. Linda has come a long way since leaving her sheltered life in Northport at age 18 to experience the world. “But growing up in that time and place, in a family grounded in Western values, served me well,” she allows. “And I’m happy to be back home.”

Get the Thursday Thirteen code here!

The purpose of the meme is to get to know everyone who participates a little bit better every Thursday. Visiting fellow Thirteeners is encouraged! If you participate, leave the link to your Thirteen in others’ comments. It’s easy, and fun! Trackbacks, pings, comment links accepted!

Today’s Thursday Thirteen edition I will be writing 13 things about my favorite author Linda Lael Miller. I’ve been reading Linda Lael Miller’s McKettrick series all week so I felt that I should make my Thursday Thirteen for this week about her. All of this information is quoted from her website, Linda Lael Miller.


Thirteen Things about Linda Lael Miller

1. Twenty-four years after she sold her first novel, Linda Lael Miller is having what anyone would call a stellar year.

2. The self-proclaimed barn goddess and author of novels set in the West of today and yesterday is celebrating exciting career milestones.

3. With 70-some books to her credit, Linda is watching her modern-day McKettrick Men trilogy soar to the top of all the national bestseller lists, and the Romance Writers of America have announced Linda as the recipient of their prestigious 2007 Lifetime Achievement Award. And the year is still young.

4. But what makes these successes all the more enjoyable is that Linda has come home, home to Spokane, Washington, home to writing the stories of her heart, stories set in the Western culture of her childhood, and home to living where she can pull on her boots and ride her beloved horses.

5. Inside, there’s the clatter of little paws, her dogs, Sadie and Bernice, and the elegant treading of two cats that Linda claims rule the roost.

6. The daughter of a town marshal, Linda grew up in Northport, WA, a community of 500 on the Columbia River, 120 miles north of her birthplace, Spokane. Her childhood remembrances include riding horses and playing cowgirl on her grandparents’ nearby farm. So rustic was her grandparents’ spread that in the early days it lacked the conveniences of electricity and running water.

7. As delightful as this childhood was, though, Linda longed to see the world. After graduating as valedictorian of her high school class, she left to pursue her dream. Because of the success of her author career, Linda was able to live part-time in London for several years, spend time in Italy and travel to such far-off destinations as Russia, Hong Kong and Israel. Now, Linda says, the wanderlust is (mostly) out of her blood, and she’s come full circle, back to the people and the places she knows and loves.

8. Before Linda begins her writing day, she takes her first cup of coffee while enjoying the scenic view of the wooded draw behind her new home. Inspired by the view, which occasionally includes a wandering moose, she focuses on her work-in-progress. It might be another contemporary Western romance, like McKettrick’s Luck, McKettrick’s Pride or McKettrick’s Heart, or it might be a new Western historical, such as July’s hardcover, A Wanted Man. It also might be a romantic thriller, such as Deadly Gamble, which launched another winning Linda Lael Miller series for her enthusiastic publisher, HQN Books.

9. Devoted to helping others pursue their dreams, Miller is excited about another endeavor. Each year she sponsors a round of competition for her Linda Lael Miller Scholarships for Women. The stipends, which she funds from her writing and speaking earnings, enable women 25 years and older to improve their lot in life through education. Unlike traditional scholarships, Linda’s may be used for childcare, transportation, or any other expense that stands between a woman’s dreams and their fulfillment.

10. It’s no wonder the protagonists in Miller’s novels are women her readers admire for their honor, courage, trustworthiness, valor and determination to succeed, despite overwhelming odds. “These timelessly admirable qualities make them excellent role models for young women,” Miller explains. “The male leads possess equally noble traits that today’s woman would be delighted to find in her life’s mate.”

11. And speaking of finding, Linda is excited about her association with The Humane Society of the United States, for whom she has become an advocate for the group’s Pets for Life program. Once someone finds a furry friend to bring into their home, Linda and The HSUS want to help them learn how to keep the critter for life.

12. Linda traces the birth of her writing career to the day when a Northport teacher told her that the stories she was writing were good, that she just might have a future in writing. Later, when she decided to write novels, she endured her share of rejection before she made her first sale in 1983.

13. Linda has come a long way since leaving her sheltered life in Northport at age 18 to experience the world. “But growing up in that time and place, in a family grounded in Western values, served me well,” she allows. “And I’m happy to be back home.”

Get the Thursday Thirteen code here!

The purpose of the meme is to get to know everyone who participates a little bit better every Thursday. Visiting fellow Thirteeners is encouraged! If you participate, leave the link to your Thirteen in others’ comments. It’s easy, and fun! Trackbacks, pings, comment links accepted!

Today’s Thursday Thirteen edition I will be writing 13 things about my favorite author Julia Quinn. All of this information is quoted from her website, Julia Quinn.

Thirteen Things about Julia Quinn

1. During her senior year at Harvard College, Julia Quinn (better known in cyberspace as JulieQ) realized that she didn’t know what she wanted to do with her life. This depressed her. In fact, the only thing that saved her sanity during this dark, dreary time was the fact that none of her friends knew, either. So she sat down with a big tub of Ben & Jerry’s and a good book and decided to figure out what to do

2. Getting a job seemed too difficult. She wouldn’t mind HAVING a job, but she certainly didn’t know how to get one.

3. Law school seemed too annoying. Everyone hated lawyers, and Julie liked to be liked.

4. Business school was not an option. They only took people who had been in the work force for at least two years, and, as noted above, Julie didn’t know how to get a job.

5. The only option left (this shows you how narrow her world-view was) was medical school. “Aha!” she thought. “I could be a good doctor.” She quickly picked up the phone and ran this idea past her parents, who were understandably baffled, since her degree was in Art History, but being the cool people they are, they said, “Great!”

6. Julie hung up the phone, blinked a couple of times, and said aloud, “Okay, so I’m going to be a doctor. Cool.” Then she pulled out a pad of paper and proceeded to figure out how long this would take. (Note: careers in medicine are not for those who crave instant gratification.) It turned out that it would be over two years before she could even ENTER medical school since she had to take all those pesky science classes in order to apply. Clearly, she needed to find something to do during that time, since she knew from experience that she probably wouldn’t be studying as much as she ought.

7. That’s when she looked at the book next to the tub of now-empty Ben & Jerry’s. It was a romance. “I could write one of those,” she thought. And so she did.

8. Two years later, just as Julie was deciding between Yale School of Medicine and Columbia College of Physicians & Surgeons, her agent called to tell her that her first two books, Splendid and Dancing at Midnight, were the subject of a fierce bidding war between two publishing houses.

9. So she put off medical school for a year and wrote Minx. Then she put off medical school for another year and wrote Everything And The Moon. Then she got a little nervous and thought that maybe she ought to give med school a try and so she picked up a scalpel, started dissecting cadavers, and learned more about the citric acid cycle than anyone (including most med students) wants to know.

10. A few months later, however, she realized that she must have experienced a bout of temporary insanity and she withdrew from medical school and wrote Brighter Than The Sun. This was followed by To Catch An Heiress and the critically acclaimed How To Marry a Marquis.

11. Julie’s writing has quickly earned a reputation for warmth and humor, and her dialogue is considered among the best in the industry. She has been profiled in TIME Magazine (a rarity among romance writers) and has even competed on the game show The Weakest Link. (To find out if she won, click here.)

12. Each year brings more accolades; in 2001 she was a double finalist in the Romance Writers of America (RWA)’s prestigious RITA Awards (for The Duke And I and The Viscount Who Loved Me), and later that year she made her debut on the NEW YORK TIMES bestseller list with An Offer From a Gentleman. 2002 saw the release of the much-anticipated Romancing Mister Bridgerton, which was voted one of the Top Ten books of the year by the membership of RWA and was a finalist for the RITA Awards in the category of long historical. To Sir Phillip, With Love received a rare starred review in Publishers Weekly, the trade magazine of the publishing industry, and was later named by that publication as one of the six best mass market original novels of the year. The popularity of the Bridgerton series continued to rise with 2004’s When He Was Wicked, and 2005’s It’s in His Kiss, both of which debuted near the top of the New York Times list.

13. In 2006, Julia Quinn released the eighth and final installment in the Bridgerton series: the much awaited On the Way to the Wedding. Julia Quinn currently lives with her family in the Pacific Northwest. If you’d like to read an essay by Julia Quinn on why it’s great to be a romance writer, click here.

Get the Thursday Thirteen code here!

The purpose of the meme is to get to know everyone who participates a little bit better every Thursday. Visiting fellow Thirteeners is encouraged! If you participate, leave the link to your Thirteen in others’ comments. It’s easy, and fun! Trackbacks, pings, comment links accepted!

Today’s Thursday Thirteen edition I will be writing 13 things about my favorite author Julia Quinn. All of this information is quoted from her website, Julia Quinn.


Thirteen Things about Julia Quinn

1. During her senior year at Harvard College, Julia Quinn (better known in cyberspace as JulieQ) realized that she didn’t know what she wanted to do with her life. This depressed her. In fact, the only thing that saved her sanity during this dark, dreary time was the fact that none of her friends knew, either. So she sat down with a big tub of Ben & Jerry’s and a good book and decided to figure out what to do

2. Getting a job seemed too difficult. She wouldn’t mind HAVING a job, but she certainly didn’t know how to get one.

3. Law school seemed too annoying. Everyone hated lawyers, and Julie liked to be liked.

4. Business school was not an option. They only took people who had been in the work force for at least two years, and, as noted above, Julie didn’t know how to get a job.

5. The only option left (this shows you how narrow her world-view was) was medical school. “Aha!” she thought. “I could be a good doctor.” She quickly picked up the phone and ran this idea past her parents, who were understandably baffled, since her degree was in Art History, but being the cool people they are, they said, “Great!”

6. Julie hung up the phone, blinked a couple of times, and said aloud, “Okay, so I’m going to be a doctor. Cool.” Then she pulled out a pad of paper and proceeded to figure out how long this would take. (Note: careers in medicine are not for those who crave instant gratification.) It turned out that it would be over two years before she could even ENTER medical school since she had to take all those pesky science classes in order to apply. Clearly, she needed to find something to do during that time, since she knew from experience that she probably wouldn’t be studying as much as she ought.

7. That’s when she looked at the book next to the tub of now-empty Ben & Jerry’s. It was a romance. “I could write one of those,” she thought. And so she did.

8. Two years later, just as Julie was deciding between Yale School of Medicine and Columbia College of Physicians & Surgeons, her agent called to tell her that her first two books, Splendid and Dancing at Midnight, were the subject of a fierce bidding war between two publishing houses.

9. So she put off medical school for a year and wrote Minx. Then she put off medical school for another year and wrote Everything And The Moon. Then she got a little nervous and thought that maybe she ought to give med school a try and so she picked up a scalpel, started dissecting cadavers, and learned more about the citric acid cycle than anyone (including most med students) wants to know.

10. A few months later, however, she realized that she must have experienced a bout of temporary insanity and she withdrew from medical school and wrote Brighter Than The Sun. This was followed by To Catch An Heiress and the critically acclaimed How To Marry a Marquis.

11. Julie’s writing has quickly earned a reputation for warmth and humor, and her dialogue is considered among the best in the industry. She has been profiled in TIME Magazine (a rarity among romance writers) and has even competed on the game show The Weakest Link. (To find out if she won, click here.)

12. Each year brings more accolades; in 2001 she was a double finalist in the Romance Writers of America (RWA)’s prestigious RITA Awards (for The Duke And I and The Viscount Who Loved Me), and later that year she made her debut on the NEW YORK TIMES bestseller list with An Offer From a Gentleman. 2002 saw the release of the much-anticipated Romancing Mister Bridgerton, which was voted one of the Top Ten books of the year by the membership of RWA and was a finalist for the RITA Awards in the category of long historical. To Sir Phillip, With Love received a rare starred review in Publishers Weekly, the trade magazine of the publishing industry, and was later named by that publication as one of the six best mass market original novels of the year. The popularity of the Bridgerton series continued to rise with 2004’s When He Was Wicked, and 2005’s It’s in His Kiss, both of which debuted near the top of the New York Times list.

13. In 2006, Julia Quinn released the eighth and final installment in the Bridgerton series: the much awaited On the Way to the Wedding. Julia Quinn currently lives with her family in the Pacific Northwest. If you’d like to read an essay by Julia Quinn on why it’s great to be a romance writer, click here.

Get the Thursday Thirteen code here!

The purpose of the meme is to get to know everyone who participates a little bit better every Thursday. Visiting fellow Thirteeners is encouraged! If you participate, leave the link to your Thirteen in others’ comments. It’s easy, and fun! Trackbacks, pings, comment links accepted!

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Phoebe Jordan
Phoebe Jordan

Phoebe Jordan

I'm a part-time aspiring romance novelist, book reviewer and blogger. I've always wanted to travel the world and learn everything I can about other countries. Learning the Italian language is one way of trying to make that dream come true. Traveling will help me with my writing because I'll be learning about the history of the U.S., Latin America, England, Italy, and Ireland, the countries I find so fascinating while reading the romance genre. I read and review romance novels of almost every subgenre along with erotic romance, mystery, sci-fi/fantasy and young adult novels. You can find the reviews at my blogs, Talk About My Favorite Authors and Phoebe Jordan's Reviews. I’ve also started a live podcast show called TAMFA | Phoebe Jordan hosted on Blog Talk Radio. This show is dedicated to everything I love about romance and young adult novels. I love having romance and young adult authors live on my show to be interviewed and showcase their books. I plan to write contemporary romance, romantic suspense, erotic romance, paranormal romance and young adult when I get my writing career started with help from Keta. I'm not sure what genre I'll write to begin with since I love to read so many different romance genres.

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TAMFA Podcast
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